In the studio

Before painting, I consult with elders; research online, in libraries, at the Royal Alberta Museum, etc. Then I create designs for the shaped panels. The panels are cut off-site. In this studio, at the University of Regina (pictured), my assistants sand and gesso each panel, and do some under-painting. In the studio next door, I come up with the interior designs and paint them.

In the studio

Before painting, I consult with elders; research online, in libraries, at the Royal Alberta Museum, etc. Then I create designs for the shaped panels. The panels are cut off-site. In this studio, at the University of Regina (pictured), my assistants sand and gesso each panel, and do some under-painting. In the studio next door, I come up with the interior designs and paint them.

Art3

Papaschase is Cree for the pileated woodpecker found in this area. It is also the name of the Chief and people whose land Edmonton displaced.

Art10

The exterior shape of this painting echoes ancient pots found in the area. In the interior, a rock is surrounded and shaped by river currents. The water is rendered in painted dots which are meant to recall beading.

Art8

The exterior shape is of a pounding stone. The interior is based on Métis quill work found in the Royal Alberta Museum collection.

Art4

This map shows a version of present day Edmonton.

Art2

The Edmonton area was known to the original Cree inhabitants as Amiskwaciy (Beaver Hills). The interior painting shows the Hudson’s Bay point blanket that was traded here for beaver pelts.

Art1

The exterior shape of this painting is of a Northern Pike. The interior painting represents a map of Edmonton from the 1880s. It shows that Edmonton was based on the French/Métis river lot system. Many of the community’s founders were Métis...